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Week 0: The starting point
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Katey’s ‘typical’ salad
Shawarma salad kebab
Veg-loaded risotto

So, what is on Watson’s plate?…

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…Hi, I’m an ‘obese’ Nutrition graduate… 

…‘What?!?!’ I imagine you thinking.  

Okay, I feel it necessary at this point to explain that I was considered a ‘healthy’ weight when I started the journey to becoming a Nutritionist 5 years ago, aged 38. However, as a stress comfort-eater I found myself craving and reaching for chocolate and other calorie-dense foods. The intense studying also encompassed sleep-deprivation and minimal time for exercise – not a great mix for staying healthy! In my younger adult years, I could eat and drink whatever I fancied with no concern. However, since my 30’s (I’m now 43), keeping my weight in check has been a constant battle!  

My comfort food – chocolate (well, the empty wrappings!)

Briefly, the boring qualification stuff… I’ve just completed an AfN (Association for Nutrition)[1] accredited Master of Science degree in Nutrition and Behaviour. Prior to that I obtained a Bachelor of Science Honours degree in Health Sciences. My main interest is in gut health, specifically the gut microbiome. These are the trillions of micro-organisms living in the gut that attribute to our health and well-being (more on that in later posts). In short, I now have a better understanding about what needs to be done to live a healthy lifestyle – I just need to maintain the motivation to do it.

Although I let myself go a bit (loads), hopefully I now have more knowledge to help me come back stronger.]

I should probably mention that I’ve followed a gluten-free and plant-based diet since I was 37, initially for health-related reasons to manage food intolerances and reduce allergic symptoms that developed in my mid-30’s. But that’s another story, maybe for another time.

One of my ‘go-to’ gluten-free, plant-based meals (risotto).

Perhaps I should also disclose that I have Dyspraxia[2] (diagnosed at 38). In my case this explains my extreme clumsiness and tendency to jump between subjects (you may notice this in my writing style!).

Since finishing my studies (well, at least for now), I’ve been wracking my brain about how to rectify this current situation – how was I going to sustain motivation to regain my healthier self? Then the answer came to me… I would write a blog to report on my progress, giving the accountability I need. So here goes…

Week 0 – The Starting Point >>>
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References:

1. Association for Nutrition (AfN), 2019. Benefits of Degree Accreditation . Available from: www.associationfornutrition.org/Default.aspx?tabid=132.

2. Dyspraxia Foundation, 2019. Dyspraxia in Adults [online]. Available from: https://dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk/dyspraxia-adults/.

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